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Esophageal Surgery

The latest STS guidelines on multimodality treatment of esophageal cancer

Guidelines for esophageal cancer?

Guidelines, guidelines, guidelines.. It seems like much of American medicine is now directed by guidelines, committees and government agencies.  We  have pay-for-performance,  “Core Measures” and even more guidelines, recommendations and requirements that attempt to pre-script the care that we provide.  This often leaves clinicians and surgeons feeling more like technicians following recipes for “cookbook medicine” to treat anonymous, “standardized” patients rather than highly skilled, extensively trained and experienced medical providers using clinical judgment, intellect and training to treat unique individuals.

Guideline fatigue, questionable “evidence” and mandated medicine

With that in mind, many healthcare providers are sick of reading and writing about “evidence-based practice recommendations and clinical guidelines”.   Some of this frustration comes from the sometimes contradictory clinical evidence regarding these mandates, such as pre-operative beta blockade.  While this medication is now mandated by the federal government, multiple studies* question the benefit of this treatment in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.

As the debate continues to rage over this therapy, is it fair that  surgeons must continue to risk their hospital’s performance scores, and surgical reimbursement for challenging the blanket administration of this medication to their patients?**

Not all guidelines created equally

The concept of clinical guidelines have its origins in the 1960’s.  While differing political camps explain the emergence of these guidelines according to their individual bias (insurance cost-cutting versus autonomy etc.), it seems obvious that these guidelines were at least, initially, designed to improve the overall care of patients with similar diagnoses, symptoms or clinical scenarios.

But when it comes to these clinical guidelines – not all guidelines are created equally.  In addition to criticism that many clinical guidelines are poorly supported by the existing literature, or based on poor quality studies,  allegations of cronyism, obvious bias/ self-serving have plagued guideline committees  particularly in the field of cardiology.

But what does this mean for thoracic surgery?   We have our own organizational committees such as the Society for Thoracic Surgeons, (aka STS),  our own recommendations, guidelines and ratings systems (national and international database).   STS and thoracic surgery based clinical guidelines address the very lifeblood of our specialty and our clinical practice.

It behooves us as a professional specialty to read, review and know these guidelines so that we can determine when and if these guidelines serve our practices and our patients.  If not, as representatives of thoracic surgery; it is our responsibility to participate and to voice our concerns and criticisms of these guidelines.  We are the watchdogs, to prevent the over-representation of commercial interests or bias into our arena of patient care.

It is also crucial that we attempt to support the crafting of recommendations to support and adopt the best practices in thoracic surgery; after all, as practicing clinicians, we know thoracics better than any outside agencies, organizations or other specialties.  With this philosophy in mind, Cirugia de Torax invites readers to become more familiar with the latest STS guidelines.

Society of Thoracic Surgeons guidelines

Thus far, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons has published eighteen guidelines on a wide variety of topics’ from antibiotic use, to cerebral protection of infants undergoing cardiac surgery, the use of TMR, to the newest guidelines on the treatment of esophageal cancer.

Cirugia de Torax would like to invite our American and International readers to participate in a review of the most recent guidelines in our next post.  What do you think of trend towards guidelines in general?  What about the guidelines for multi-modality treatment in esophageal cancer?  Love them?  Hate them?  Any omissions or errors?  Any changes or suggestions for future versions?

Deadline for submission of commentary, criticism or other remarks  is January 15, 2015.

Notes:

* Link requires (free) subscription

** Surgeons can document a ‘variance’ on a case-by- case basis when omitting this and other prescribed core measures under a limited set of circumstances.

 

Article for Review

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Practice Guidelines on the Role of Multimodality Treatment for Cancer of the Esophagus and Gastroesophageal Junction.

Little, Alex G. et al. (2014).  The Annals of Thoracic Surgery , Volume 98 , Issue 5 , 1880 – 1885.  pdf version.

 

Additional reference articles

1.  Weisz G1, Cambrosio A, Keating P, Knaapen L, Schlich T, Tournay VJ.  (2007).   The emergence of clinical practice guidelines. Milbank Q. Dec;85(4):691-727.

2.  The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Esophageal Cancer Guideline Series.  Mitchell, John D. et al. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery , Volume 96 , Issue 1 , 7

3.  The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Staging of Patients With Esophageal Cancer.  Varghese, Thomas K. et al.  The Annals of Thoracic Surgery , Volume 96 , Issue 1 , 346 – 356

Copies of all STS guidelines are available on-line here.

About K Eckland

World of Thoracic Surgery is a blog about the work, research, and practices of thoracic surgeons around the world. It includes case studies, [sometimes] dry research, interviews with thoracic surgeons along with patient perspectives, and feedback.

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