//
you're reading...
Future of Thoracic Surgery, Uncategorized

Why you should have your thoracic surgery at the university affiliated hospital

While working on a recent interview with one of the New Masters of Thoracic Surgery, I talked about one of his biggest contributions to his local community, which was establishing the first dedicated thoracic surgery program in that city.  Then I realized that maybe readers wouldn’t know what that was important.. This article came from that interview 

Riverbank

Memphis, Tennessee at night

Big hospitals, little hospitals.  Major health systems and community facilities battle it out of our insurance dollars.  Private wings, VIP suites, catered meals and fancy robots all try and lure patients in the doors.  As a writer of several books based on the business of medical tourism – I’ve seen that the appeal of glistening marble floors, free fancy coffees and an aura of exclusivity can trump the principles of safe and effective patient care when it comes to attracting paying patients.  This is acutely evident in the surgery wars; the wars to attract referrals between private practice and academic medicine (which usually, but not always – has less glamorous facilities**).  But for a person facing a large, and possibly life-saving thoracic surgery, we need to explore the differences that are more than just skin-deep.

Subspecialty interest and skill

The difference between a true thoracic surgery program and a cardiothoracic surgery private practice group is often marked by the degree of continuing competence,  subspecialty interest and skill in minimally invasive techniques. (For more about the overall differences between general thoracic and cardiothoracic surgery, read here.)  This post is discussing the pitfalls of the private practice medical group and surgical referral patterns.  Surgical partners in a lucrative practice don’t have continuing education requirements, but residencies do.  In order to teach surgical residents, the attendings themselves need to be well-versed in the latest operating techniques and surgical outcomes research.

Where the patients come from

Private practice groups get their patients thru an ‘old boy network’ particularly in cities with few strong ties to university medical centers.  Patients don’t just walk thru the door to see a thoracic surgeon – they are referred to one.  Most people have never even heard of a thoracic surgeon before they or a loved one needs one.

As we talked about in one of our very first posts, “Who is performing your thoracic surgery?” – just because you need thoracic surgery, that doesn’t guarantee that a patient will see an actual board certified thoracic surgeon.

In a referral based system, patients are often not referred based on the skills or merits of the surgeon in the operating room, his rates of post-operative infection or even the health system affiliations – but by his charm, wit or connections on the social scene.  In a city like Memphis, which is awash in old money, southern tradition and the Junior League, this means that patients are referred to the surgeon based on the friendships amongst wives, college fraternity friendships or 6 am tee-off times.

Cardiothoracic versus general thoracic

Often times, the surgeon is not particularly gifted or even interested in modern lung or esophageal surgery techniques, meaning that the surgeon is most likely to revert to large thoracotomies or median sternotomies because that’s where his comfort lies.  There is no standard or requirement to master minimally invasive techniques, so often these surgeons don’t.  It’s not a criticism of cardiothoracic surgery, but a basic reality.  A heart surgeon wants to be a heart surgeon.  He doesn’t necessarily want to do lung or esophageal surgery, but he might not turn away these cases either, because everyone likes to make a living.

In comparison, a dedicated thoracic surgery program, particularly in an academic setting; is made up exclusively of thoracic surgeons who live and breathe general (noncardiac) thoracic surgery.  This is what they do, this what they want to do, this is what they have always wanted to do.  Academic settings also have more stringent requirements (in general) regarding maintaining clinical and educational competencies.  These surgeons are learning or teaching the newer techniques, reading and writing the literature and actively pursuing advances in the field.  This dedication is important for more than the most obvious reason – sure, you want your surgeon to be competent in the operating room – but you also want him to be knowledgeable and skilled outside of it.

Academic centers with general thoracic surgery programs are more likely to have a protocol based, formalized multidisciplinary approach to thoracic disease.   This means that patients are treated by a team of specialists in a cooperative fashion.  There are no conflicts between what the oncologist wants to do and what the surgeon wants.   If the patient needs pre-operative radiation or chemotherapy, it’s coordinated in conjunction with surgery, so that the patient receives care in a timely and organized fashion based on the current treatment recommendations and clinical research**.

But American medical care is the best in the world, right?

Multidisciplinary approach, evidence-based practice, ongoing academic research and continuing surgical education: All of these themes don’t sound extraordinarily unusual to readers because I have been discussing and presenting surgeons who work within these types of programs for years here at Thoracics.org.

Not the norm

But it’s actually not the norm in the United States, which means that many American patients get woefully inadequate, outdated or just plain uncoordinated care.  These patients have more pain, more suffering, longer lengths of stay, more complications and less quality of life than any of the patients who have been cared for by just about any surgeon ever mentioned on this site.  Patients at the University of Pittsburgh, Duke, University of Virginia or John Hopkins were getting great care, but patients here in Memphis, Las Vegas or any of the other cities or regions without these types of  specialized programs, weren’t and often still aren’t.

When added to the growing shortages in this specialty area, an appointment with a trained thoracic surgeon may become an elusive endeavor.  Especially if patients don’t know to ask.

* A thoracic surgery program that focuses on diseases and conditions of the lungs, esophagus and mediastinum.

** There are several academic medicine facilities that have managed to boast their own celebrity style perks, like the VIP wings at John Hopkins.

 

About K Eckland

World of Thoracic Surgery is a blog about the work, research, and practices of thoracic surgeons around the world. It includes case studies, [sometimes] dry research, interviews with thoracic surgeons along with patient perspectives, and feedback.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: