//
you're reading...
New Masters

Living legends and Cirugia de Torax

Readers at Cirugia de Torax have certainly noticed that there are numerous articles regarding the work of Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas.  This week in particular, after a recent thoracic surgery conference and an afternoon in the operating room – there is a lot to say about the Spanish surgeon.

It’s also hard to escape that fact that I regard him in considerable awe and esteem for his numerous contributions to thoracic surgery and prolific publications.  I imagine that this is similar to how many people felt about Drs. Cooley, Pearson or Debakey during their prime.

Making thoracic surgery accessible

But the difference is Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas himself.  Despite the international fame and critical surgical acclaim, he remains friendly and approachable. He has also been extremely supportive of my work, at a time when not many people in thoracic surgery see the necessity or utility of a nurse-run website.

After all, the internet is filled with other options for readers; CTSnet.org, multiple societies like the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), and massive compilations like journal-based sites (Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Journal of Thoracic Disease, Interactive Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery).

But the difference between Cirugia de Torax and those sites is like the difference between Dr. Gonzalez Rivas and many of the original masters of surgery.  Approachability and accessibility.

This site is specifically designed for a wider range of appeal, for both professionals in thoracic surgery, and for our consumers – the patients and their families.  Research, innovation, news and development matters to all of us, not just the professionals in the hallowed halls of academia.  But sometimes it doesn’t feel that way.

Serving practicing surgeons

For practice-based clinicians, and international surgeons publication in an academia-based journal requires a significant effort.  These surgeons usually don’t have research assistants, residents and government grants to support their efforts, collect their data and clean up their grammar.   Often English is a second or third language.  But that doesn’t mean that they don’t make valuable contributions to their patients and the practice of thoracic surgery.   This is their platform, to bring their efforts to their peers and the world.

Heady aspirations

That may sound like a lofty goal, but we have readers from over a 110 countries, with hundreds of subscribers along with over 6,000 people with Cirugia de Torax directly on their smart phone.  Each month, we attract more hits and more readers.

Patient-focused information

That’s important for the other half of our mission – connecting our patients with the world of thoracic surgery. Discussing research findings, describing procedures and presenting information to the people who are actually undergoing the procedures we are writing about.  Letting them know what’s new, what’s changed – and what to expect.  

Every day, at least 200 people read “Blebs, Bullae and Spontanous Pneumothorax”.  Why?  Because it’s a concise article that explains what blebs are, how a pneumothorax occurs and how it’s treated.  Another hundred people usually go on to read the accompanying case report about blebectomy, for similar reasons.  There are links for more information, CT scans and intra-operative photos included, so that people can find exactly what they need with a minimum of effort.

Avoiding ‘Google overload’

With the massive volume of information available on the internet, high-quality, easily understood, applicable information has actually become even more difficult for patients to find than ever before.  Patients spend hours upon hours browsing through academic jargon, commercial websites and biased materials while attempting to sift through the reams of information for pertinent and easily understandable information.  There is also a lot of great material out there – so we provide links to reputable sites, recommend well-written articles and discuss related research.

Connecting patients to surgeons

We also provide patients with more information about the people they are entrusting their bodies, their hopes and their lives to.  It’s important that they know about the Dr. Benny Wekslers, the Dr. Hanao Chens, and the Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas out there.

Keeping it ‘real’

Looking over the shoulder of Dr. Gonzalez Rivas in the operating room

Looking over the shoulder of Dr. Gonzalez Rivas in the operating room

As much as I may admire the work and the accomplishments of Dr. Gonzalez-Rivas – it’s important not to place him on a pedestal.  He and his colleagues are real, practicing surgeons who operating on regular people, not just heads of state and celebrities.  So when we interview these surgeons and head to the OR, it’s time to forget about the accolades, the published papers and the fancy titles. It’s time to focus on the operations, the techniques, the patients and the outcomes because ‘master of thoracic surgery’ or rural surgeon – the operation and patient are all that really matters.

K. Eckland

About K Eckland

World of Thoracic Surgery is a blog about the work, research, and practices of thoracic surgeons around the world. It includes case studies, [sometimes] dry research, interviews with thoracic surgeons along with patient perspectives, and feedback.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: