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Meetings/ Conference coverage

ALAT : The Grand Trifecta

The Ethicon (Johnson & Johnson) sponsored session was by far, the best of the conference – and an excellent overview of modern technologies in thoracic surgery.

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starting with Dr. Ricardo Buitrago (purple tie), Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas (blue tie) and Dr. Mario Ghefter (pink tie) are changing the future of thoracic surgery

Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas

“Is uni-port surgery feasible for advanced cancers?”  Short answer: Yes.

The first speaker, was Dr. Diego Gonzalez Rivas of Coruna, Spain.  He is a world-renown thoracic surgeon and innovator of uni-port thoracoscopic surgery.  He discussed the evolution of single port surgery as well as the most recent developments with this technique, including more advanced and technically challenging cases such as chest wall resections (2013), sleeve resections/ reconstructions (2013), pulmonary artery reconstructions (2013) and surgery on non-intubated, awake patients (2014).

Experience and Management of bleeding

The biggest challenges to surgeons learning this technique is management of bleeding.  But as he explained in previous lectures, this can be overcome with a direct approach.  (these lectures and YouTube videos, Dr. Gonzalez explains the best ways to manage intra-operative bleeding.) In the vast majority of cases – this did not require deviation or conversion from the uni-port technique.)

As surgeons gain proficiency with this technique which mirrors open surgery, the only contra-indications for surgical resection of cancerous tissue (by single port) are tumors of great size, and surgeon discomfort with the technique.

Dr. Mario Ghefter

My favorite lecture of the series was given by Dr. Mario Ghefter of Sao Paolo, Brazil.  While his lecture was ostensibly about video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS), it was more of a retrospective vision and discussion of the modern history of thoracic surgery as seen through the eyes of a 22 year veteran surgeon.

He talked about the beginnings of VATS surgery and the contributions from such legends as Cefolio and D’Amico, including the 2005 paper – and modern-day thoracic bible, “Troubleshooting video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (Demmy, James, Swanson, McKenna and D’Amico).

Dr. Ghefter also talked about how improved imaging and diagnostic procedures such as PET-CT and EBUS have been able to provide additional diagnostic information pre-operatively that helps surgeons to plan their procedures and treatment strategies more effectively.

Dr. Mario Ghefter

Dr. Mario Ghefter

As a counterpoint to both Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Buitrago, Dr. Ghefter acquitted himself admirably.  He reminded audience members that even the newer technologies have some drawbacks – both as procedures and for the surgeons themselves.

He also successfully argued (in my opinion) that while the popularity of procedures such as multiple port VATS and even open thoracotomies have dropped drastically as thoracic surgeons embrace newer technologies, there will always be a place and time for these more traditional procedures.

Dr. Mario Ghefter is the Director of Thoracic Surgery at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual – Sāo Paulo and on staff at the Hospital Alemão Oswaldo Cruz.

Dr. Ricardo Buitrago

Native Colombian (and my former professor), Dr. Ricardo Buitrago is acknowledged as one of the foremost experts in robotic thoracic surgery in Latin America.

During his presentation, he discussed the principles and basics of use of robotic techniques in thoracic surgery.  He reviewed the existing literature surrounding the use of robotic surgery, and comparisons of outcomes between thoracic surgery and traditional lobectomy.

He reviewed several recent robotic surgery cases and the use of robotics as a training tool for residents and fellows.

While he mentioned some of previously discussed limitations of robotic surgery (namely cost of equipment) he cited recent studies demonstrating significant cost savings due to decreased length of stay and a reduced incidence of surgical complications.

He also discussed recent studies (by pioneering surgeons such as Dr. Dylewski) demonstrated short operating times of around 90 minutes.

About K Eckland

World of Thoracic Surgery is a blog about the work, research, and practices of thoracic surgeons around the world. It includes case studies, [sometimes] dry research, interviews with thoracic surgeons along with patient perspectives, and feedback.

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